Kliṣṭaprajñā

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kliṣṭaprajñā (T. shes rab nyon mongs can ཤེས་རབ་ཉོན་མོངས་པ་ཅན་)[1] is translated as "afflictive intelligence," "corrupted intelligece," "disturbed discrimination," etc.[2][3] Kliṣṭaprajñā are incorrect speculations or conclusions reached by incorrect analysis.[4]

Saṃsāra, Nirvāṇa, and Buddha Nature explains this term in the context of a description of the five types of wrong view; the text states:

These five erroneous views are forms of corrupt intelligence that either grasp the I to exist inherently or, based on that, develop further mistaken conceptions. They act as the basis for all problems caused by afflictions and all other mistaken outlooks and create turmoil in our lives. Wisdom is their antidote.
Saying these views are "corrupt intelligence" (shes rab nyon mongs chan) means they are incorrect speculations or conclusions reached by incorrect analysis. They are unreliable minds that lack a realistic foundation. They are called intelligence (prajna) because they distinguish their object and know its qualities; they are corrupt (kileśa) because they misapprehend their object.[4]

Notes

  1. Note: the Sanskrit term is reconstructed from the Tibetan; it is not clear if the term appears in Sanskrit texts, or if it is used in other traditions.
  2. Internet-icon.svg ཤེས་རབ་ཉོན་མོངས་པ་ཅན་, Christian-Steinert Dictionary
  3. Rangjung a-circle30px.jpg shes_rab_nyon_mongs_can
  4. 4.0 4.1 Dalai Lama & Thubten Chodron 2018b, s.v. Chapter 3: True Origins of Duḥkha, "Afflictive views".


Sources