Daisaku Ikeda

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Daisaku Ikeda
DaisakuIkedaTokyoMay2010.jpg
Daisaku Ikeda(May 2010)
Personal
Born (1928-01-02) 2 January 1928 (age 91)
Japanese Empire, Tokyo, Ōta
Spouse Kaneko Ikeda (池田香峯子)
Parents
  • Ichi Ikeda (mother)
  • Nenokichi Ikeda (father)
Signature Daisaku Ikeda signature darker.png

Daisaku Ikeda (池田 大作, Ikeda Daisaku, born 2 January 1928) is a Buddhist philosopher, educator, author, and nuclear disarmament advocate.[1][2][3] He has served as the third president and then honorary president of the Soka Gakkai, the largest of Japan's new religious movements.[4] Ikeda is the founding president of the Soka Gakkai International (SGI), the world's largest Buddhist lay organization with approximately 12 million practitioners in 192 countries and territories.[5][6]

Ikeda was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1928, to a family of seaweed farmers. He survived the devastation of World War II as a teenager, which he said left an indelible mark on his life and fueled his quest to solve the fundamental causes of human conflict. At age 19, Ikeda began practicing Nichiren Buddhism and joined a youth group of the Soka Gakkai Buddhist association, which led to his lifelong work developing the global peace movement of SGI and founding dozens of institutions dedicated to fostering peace, culture and education.[6]:3[7]

Ikeda's vision for the SGI has been described as a "borderless Buddhist humanism that emphasizes free thinking and personal development based on respect for all life."[6]:26 In the 1960s, Ikeda worked to reopen Japan's national relations with China and also to establish the Soka education network of humanistic schools from kindergartens through university level, while beginning to write what would become his multi-volume historical novel, The Human Revolution, about the Soka Gakkai's development during his mentor Josei Toda's tenure. In the 1970s, he established the Soka Gakkai International and initiated a series of citizen diplomacy efforts through international educational and cultural exchanges for peace. Since the 1980s, he has increasingly called for the elimination of nuclear weapons.[6]:23–25

By 2015, Ikeda had published more than 50 dialogues with scholars, peace activists and leading world figures. In his role as SGI president, Ikeda has visited 55 nations and spoken on subjects including peace, environment, economics, women's rights, interfaith dialogue, nuclear disarmament, and Buddhism and science. Every year on the anniversary of the SGI's founding, January 26, Ikeda submits a peace proposal to the United Nations.[6]:11[8]

References

  1. Dayle Bethel (1974). "The Political Ideology of Ikeda Daisaku, President of Soka Gakkai". International Education. 3 (2). 
  2. Jason Goulah; Takao Ito (2012). "Daisaku Ikeda's Curriculum of Soka Education: Creating Value Through Dialogue, Global Citizenship, and 'Human Education' in the Mentor-Disciple Relationship". Curriculum Inquiry. 42 (1). 
  3. Editors (3 February 2015). "No More Nukes". Tricycle. Archived from the original on 18 February 2015. Retrieved 19 February 2015. 
  4. Daniel Métraux (2013). "Soka Gakkai International: Japanese Buddhism on a Global Scale". Virginia Review of Asian Studies. 
  5. Clark Strand (Winter 2008). "Faith in Revolution". Triycle. Retrieved 19 February 2015. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Olivier Urbain (2010). Daisaku Ikeda's Philosophy of Peace. I.B. Tauris. ISBN 978-1-84885-304-1. 
  7. "Timeline of Daisaku Ikeda's Life". daisakuikeda.org. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  8. "Daisaku Ikeda CV". daisakuikeda.org. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 


Further reading

  • Seager, Richard: Encountering the Dharma: Daisaku Ikeda, Soka Gakkai, and the Globalization of Buddhist Humanism. University of California Press, 2006; ISBN 978-0-520-24577-8
  • Urbain, Olivier: Daisaku Ikeda's Philosophy of Peace: Dialogue, Transformation and Global Citizenship. I.B. Tauris, 2010; ISBN 978-1-84885-304-1

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Ajahn Amaro Bhikkhu Analayo Reb Anderson James H. Austin Alan Ball (screenwriter)
Martine Batchelor Stephen Batchelor (author) Ezra Bayda Jan Chozen Bays Alexander Berzin
Bhikkhu Sujato Alfred Bloom (Buddhist) Bhikkhu Bodhi William Bodiford Sujin Boriharnwanaket
Tara Brach Shoryu Bradley Ajahn Brahm Arthur Braverman David Brazier
David Chadwick (writer) Pema Chodron Thubten Chodron Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche 14th Dalai Lama
Taisen Deshimaru K. L. Dhammajoti Phra Dhammavisuddhikavi Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche Zoketsu Norman Fischer
Charles Tenshin Fletcher James Ishmael Ford Francesca Freemantle Gil Fronsdal Stephen Fulder
Gary Gach Rupert Gethin Tetsugen Bernard Glassman Natalie Goldberg Joseph Goldstein
Richard Gombrich Oscar R. Gómez Henepola Gunaratana Ruben Habito Steve Hagen
Joan Halifax Shodo Harada Richard Hayes (professor) Steven Heine Dennis Hirota
Hsing Yun Cheri Huber Daisaku Ikeda Jeffrey Hopkins Thupten Jinpa
Y Karunadasa Robert Kennedy (Jesuit) Khandro Rinpoche Khantipalo Second Beru Khyentse
Anne C. Klein Jack Kornfield Erik Pema Kunsang Jakusho Kwong Geri Larkin
David Loy Dan Lusthaus Vicki Mackenzie Robert Magliola
Master Lian Tzi Dennis Merzel Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche Phillip Moffitt Glenn H. Mullin
Rob Nairn Namkhai Norbu Katukurunde Nyanananda Thera Gedhun Choekyi Nyima Shōhaku Okumura
Erdne Ombadykow Tenzin Palmo Ajahn Pasanno Piya Tan Red Pine (author)
Prayudh Payutto John Myrdhin Reynolds Ringu Tulku Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche Tsenzhab Serkong Rinpoche
Larry Rosenberg Hiro Sachiya Sharon Salzberg Padma Samten Shozan Jack Haubner
Ajahn Sucitto Ajahn Sumedho Thanissaro Bhikkhu Soma Thera Chokyi Sengay
Tashi Tsering (Chenrezig) Tashi Tsering (Jamyang) Tashi Tsering (tibetologist)
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