Dirgha Agama

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Dirgha Agama. (Skt. Dīrghāgama; T. Lung ring po; C. Chang Ahan jing; J. Jōagongyō; K. Chang Aham kyŏng 長阿含經).[1] In English, “The Collection of Long Discourses” or "Long Discourses"; an agama from the Sanskrit tradition that corresponds to the Dīgha Nikāya of the Pali Canon.

A Chinese translation of the text, that is attributed to the Dharmaguptaka school, is included in the Chinese Canon. This translation was completed by Buddhayaśas (佛陀耶舍) and Zhu Fonian (竺佛念) in the Late Qin dynasty (後秦), dated to 413 CE. This recension contains 30 sūtras in contrast to the 34 suttas of the Dīgha Nikāya of the Pali Canon. The original Sanskrit text for Dharmaguptaka rencension is lost.[2]

In the 1990s, extensive fragments of a Sanskrit recension of the Dīrgha Āgama text were discovered. These fragments are believed to belong to a Sarvastivada recension of the text.[3][4]

Portions of the Sarvastidan recension also survive in Tibetan translation.

Translations

References

  1. Princeton Dict icon 166px.png Buswell & Lopez 2014, Dīrghāgama
  2. Princeton Dict icon 166px.png Buswell & Lopez 2014, Dīrghāgama
  3. Between the Empires: Society in India 300 BCE to 400 CE by Patrick Olivelle. Oxford University Press, 2006 ISBN 0-19-530532-9 pg 356
  4. Princeton Dict icon 166px.png Buswell & Lopez 2014, Dīrghāgama


Source

  • Princeton Dict icon 166px.png Buswell, Robert E.; Lopez, Donald S. (2014), The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism, Princeton University