Sutras of the Sarvāstivādin Canon

From Encyclopedia of Buddhism
Jump to: navigation, search

The Sutras of the Sarvāstivādin Canon tradition consists of the following sections:[1]

  • Dirgha Agama - about two-thirds of the original Sanskrit manuscript were discovered in Afganistan the 1990s. This Sanskrit text has not yet been translated. (This text was not translated into Chinese.)
  • Madhyama Agama - is currently extant only in Chinese translation (Chinese Canon T26; trans. Gotama Saṅghadeva)
  • Samyukta Agama - is currently extant only in Chinese translation (Chinese Canon T99; trans. Guṇabhadra)

According to Bhante Sujato, scholars at present have "a nearly complete collection of sūtras from the Sarvāstivāda school"[1] thanks to a recent discovery in Afghanistan of roughly two-thirds of the Dīrgha Āgama in Sanskrit. The Madhyama Āgama and Saṃyukta Āgama have long been available in Chinese translation. The Sarvāstivāda is therefore the only early school besides the Theravada for which we have a roughly complete sutra collection, although unlike the Theravada it has not all been preserved in the original language.

References


Sources