Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche

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Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche
Yongey-Mingyur-Rinpoche-in-2016.jpg
Mingyur Rinpoche in 2016
Religion Kagyu Nyingma
Personal
Born 1975
Nepal
Senior posting
Title Rinpoche

Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche (born 1975)[1] is a Tibetan teacher and master of the Karma Kagyu and Nyingma lineages of Tibetan Buddhism. He has authored two best-selling books and oversees the Tergar Meditation Community, a global network of Buddhist meditation centers.

Background

Mingyur Rinpoche was born in Nepal in 1975. His brothers are Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche, Tsikey Chokling Rinpoche, and Tsoknyi Rinpoche and his nephews are Phakchok Rinpoche and Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche. From the age of nine, his father, Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche, taught him meditation, passing on to him the most essential instructions of the Dzogchen and Mahamudra traditions.[1]

At the age of eleven, Mingyur Rinpoche began studies at Sherab Ling Monastery[ in northern India, the seat of Tai Situ Rinpoche. Two years later, Mingyur Rinpoche began a traditional three-year retreat at Sherab Ling.[1] At age twenty, Mingyur Rinpoche became the functioning abbot of Sherab Ling.[1] At twenty-three, he received full monastic ordination.[1] During this time, Mingyur Rinpoche received important Dzogchen transmissions from Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche.[1] At the age of nineteen, he enrolled at Dzongsar Institute, where, under the tutelage of the renowned Khenpo Kunga Wangchuk, he studied the primary topics of the Buddhist academic tradition, including Middle Way philosophy and Buddhist logic.

Rinpoche has overseen the Kathmandu Tergar Osel Ling Monastery, founded by his father, since 2010. He also opened a shedra (monastic college) at the monastery.[2]

In June 2011, Mingyur Rinpoche left his monastery in Bodhgaya to begin a period of extended retreat. Rinpoche left in the middle of the night, taking nothing with him, but leaving a farewell letter.[3]

He spent four years as a wandering yogi.[4]

Publications

  • The Joy of Living: Unlocking the Secret & Science of Happiness, Harmony Books, 2007. ISBN 978-0-307-34625-4
  • Joyful Wisdom: Embracing Change and Finding Freedom, Harmony Books, April 2009. ISBN 978-0307407795
  • Ziji, the Puppy who Learned to Meditate, Tergar International, 2009
  • Turning Confusion into Clarity: A Guide to the Foundation Practices of Tibetan Buddhism (Boulder: Snow Lion, 2014)

References


External Links

Videos

Search for videos:


Selected videos:

  • The Causes of Anxiety and Suffering
    Description: In this teaching, Mingyur Rinpoche talks about the panic attacks that he experienced as a child and how he used compassion and calm-abiding meditation to free himself from anxiety. Mingyur Rinpoche teaches these forms of meditation in his Joy of Living Level 1(Calming the Mind) and Level 2 (Opening the Heart) courses. You can discuss this monthly teaching in the Monthly Teachings Forum of learning.tergar.org under the topic The Causes of Anxiety and Suffering.

    To learn more about meditation or about Mingyur Rinpoche and his teachings, please visit the Tergar Meditation Community online

Living people list

Living people

Main subcategories of People are: Historical people - Living people - All people - People categories ... (Is a bio not here, or minimal?)

Ajahn Amaro Bhikkhu Analayo Reb Anderson James H. Austin Alan Ball (screenwriter)
Martine Batchelor Stephen Batchelor (author) Ezra Bayda Jan Chozen Bays Alexander Berzin
Bhikkhu Sujato Alfred Bloom (Buddhist) Bhikkhu Bodhi William Bodiford Sujin Boriharnwanaket
Tara Brach Shoryu Bradley Ajahn Brahm Arthur Braverman David Brazier
David Chadwick (writer) Pema Chodron Thubten Chodron Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche 14th Dalai Lama
Taisen Deshimaru K. L. Dhammajoti Phra Dhammavisuddhikavi Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche Zoketsu Norman Fischer
Charles Tenshin Fletcher James Ishmael Ford Francesca Freemantle Gil Fronsdal Stephen Fulder
Gary Gach Rupert Gethin Tetsugen Bernard Glassman Natalie Goldberg Joseph Goldstein
Richard Gombrich Oscar R. Gómez Henepola Gunaratana Ruben Habito Steve Hagen
Joan Halifax Shodo Harada Richard Hayes (professor) Steven Heine Dennis Hirota
Hsing Yun Cheri Huber Daisaku Ikeda Jeffrey Hopkins Thupten Jinpa
Y Karunadasa Robert Kennedy (Jesuit) Khandro Rinpoche Khantipalo Second Beru Khyentse
Anne C. Klein Jack Kornfield Erik Pema Kunsang Jakusho Kwong Geri Larkin
David Loy Dan Lusthaus Vicki Mackenzie Robert Magliola
Master Lian Tzi Dennis Merzel Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche Phillip Moffitt Glenn H. Mullin
Rob Nairn Namkhai Norbu Katukurunde Nyanananda Thera Gedhun Choekyi Nyima Shōhaku Okumura
Erdne Ombadykow Tenzin Palmo Ajahn Pasanno Piya Tan Red Pine (author)
Prayudh Payutto John Myrdhin Reynolds Ringu Tulku Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche Tsenzhab Serkong Rinpoche
Larry Rosenberg Hiro Sachiya Sharon Salzberg Padma Samten Shozan Jack Haubner
Ajahn Sucitto Ajahn Sumedho Thanissaro Bhikkhu Soma Thera Chokyi Sengay
Tashi Tsering (Chenrezig) Tashi Tsering (Jamyang) Tashi Tsering (tibetologist)
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